No, I Haven’t Forgotten Champagne

The holidays were already upon us, and I hadn’t done any of my obligatory wine-journalist holiday Champagne stories. But there it was: The day of the New York Wine Press Holiday Champagne Luncheon had arrived. Sixteen prestige cuvée Champagnes were served. The Brasserie made special efforts this year to present a lunch even better and more elegant than usual, because this – our 13th such feast – was our last at this near-historic location: The Brasserie will close after Christmas.

It’s hard to exaggerate just how extraordinary an event this was, with so many examples of such high-caliber Champagnes over several courses of dishes chosen to show them at their best. And I – poor I – had had hip replacement surgery just 2½ weeks previously, and at that moment was taking strong painkillers as well as antibiotics, with which I had been strictly cautioned not to drink alcohol. So what did I do?

Sip and spit, my friends. Sip and spit. And occasionally swallow, when I just couldn’t stand abstinence any longer.

So here I am, keyboard in hand once again, heroically beating down my post-operative pain so as to altruistically – I do it all for you, my loyal readers, all for you – and conscientiously report on the best of these best bottles. Believe me, this was hard work. I didn’t enjoy it at all. Honest.

Wine Press Menu

A lovely menu, as you can see, and an imposing array of wines. Bargain hunters might as well stop reading now: All these wines are expensive, some almost prohibitively so. The Perrier-Jouet Belle Epoque Blanc de Blancs 2002 – a brilliant wine from a superb vintage – topped the scale at a suggested retail price of $367 a bottle, and the Pol Roger Sir Winston Churchill was next at $250. Clearly, these are not quaffing or clambake wines, but the most special bottles for the most special occasions.

To a certain extent, tasting wines of this caliber becomes an exercise in looking for flaws, so you can find a reason, after allowing for the differences of vintage and house style, to prefer one wine to another. I can’t say these were all flawless wines, but I couldn’t find one that I didn’t like. Most were big, but their heft was uniformly worn gracefully, so all seemed supple and live on the palate. In fact, the oldest wine in the set – the Henriot Cuvee des Enchanteleurs Brut 2000 – seemed among the freshest of them all, a big, elegant, complex wine, with years of life seemingly left in it. Henriot has long been among my favorite producers, and this particular wine was probably my favorite of the day.

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Flight One

Flight 1-a

In the first flight, I ever so slightly preferred the Lamiable Les Meslaines Grand Cru 2008, though Ed McCarthy, who selected the wines for the occasion and commented on all of them, thought it a bit too young – which it no doubt is.

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Flight Two

Flight 2-a

The second flight was more challenging. These wines were all a touch fuller and more complex than the first flight. I couldn’t name a clear favorite and dithered back and forth between the exhilarating Piper-Heidsieck Rare Brut 2002 and the forceful Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame 2006.

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Flight Three

Flight 3-a

The next course and flight again ratcheted the heft and complexity stakes up a bit higher, each of these four wines being so distinct from the others as to make comparisons pretty pointless. I found the Cristal surprisingly light (for Cristal), the Comtes de Champagnes funky in the nose though lovely on the palate, the Belle Epoque complex and intriguing but not as full as I would have wished for, and the Mesnil sur Oger marked by very unusual – and a little unsettling – fresh hay and wheat scents. I’d love to have another go at this flight on a medication-free day.

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Flight Four

Flight 4-a

Of the final five wines, there is very little I can say. They are all great Champagnes, all classic, and all showed superbly with the rare duck breast. Bollinger, Pol Roger, and Krug are the heaviest hitters of a line-up of heavy hitters, while the Dom Perignon and the Cuvee des Enchanteleurs showed overwhelming elegance and complexity. As I said before, my palate tilts toward the Henriot house style, but there isn’t a one of these wines that I wouldn’t happily drink at any opportunity. Maybe to celebrate when I finally finish rehab . . .

I would be seriously remiss if I didn’t acknowledge here the splendid work done this year, as every preceding year, by Harriet Lembeck, chair of the New York Wine Press, and Ed McCarthy, its “Champagne Procurer General,” and Sharon Colabello, the Brasserie’s Director of Catering. That team did a wonderful job in putting together this seamless, informative, enjoyable, and thoroughly impressive occasion.

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“Happy Christmas to All, and to All a Good Night!”

4 Responses to “No, I Haven’t Forgotten Champagne”

  1. Ed McCarthy Says:

    My title has been changed to “Solicitor-General.” “Procurer” had an unhealthy ring to it.. The last flight of five was indeed amazing. My one major complaint was the glasses provided by the Brasserie; very sub-standard—not worthy of such great Champagnes.

    • Tom Maresca Says:

      I confess to having enjoyed the unhealthy ring of “Procurer.” However, “Solicitor” can carry enough ambiguity to suit me, too.

  2. Jonathan Levine Says:

    I too was there and Tom you looked just fine. No trace of discomfort showed on your visage. The event was spectacular. My favorites were the Dom Ruinart and the Henriot.. I join you in a salute to Harriet, Ed and Sharon. Happy Holidays

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